Scotland: Stunning Gardens to Visit

We have a tiny sunken garden at home and I am very much a reluctant gardener who will do what needs doing and little more. This doesn’t stop me enjoying visiting gardens much bigger than ours, partly to just enjoy the beauty of the flowers and the design and also for ideas for plants that might survive my semi-neglect. Scotland might not spring to mind when you think of gardens but it has plenty of inspirational ones that you can visit. Some gardens are attached to a big house or castle but being outdoor types we often stick to the garden and grounds, rather than go into the house.

This isn’t a comprehensive list but is a selection of some of my favourites. Discover Scottish Gardens will give you more ideas. The corresponding photograph to each garden is mentioned in the brackets after its name.

Logan Botanic Garden near Stranraer (top of page)

On the south-west tip of Scotland, Logan Botanic Garden is a paradise warmed by the gulf stream. On our visit we started in the walled garden that has tree ferns and palms, ponds and a rock garden. From here we wandered up to the terrace for a view over the gardens and then explored the woodland area. This is cool and shaded with trees from across the world. Finally we peeped into the conservatory for those plants that need more protection. These gardens have an excellent cafe too and plenty of parking.

Gordon Castle Walled Garden (top right)

This beautiful walled kitchen garden at Gordon Castle is a real gem. Near the River Spey and Fochabers, the garden has been restored to its former glory and is now both a productive and a glorious place to be. Flowers grow with the fruit and vegetables and the produce is used in their own beauty range and gins and is freshly picked and becomes an ingredient in dishes in their popular cafe. This is a fabulous place to include on a walk around the River Spey.

Attadale Gardens, Strathcarron (top left)

At Attadale on Scotland’s amazing west coast you get both fantastic gardens and a sculpture park rolled into one. We received a warm welcome when we arrived on a drizzly day, were handed an umbrella incase the rain got heavier, given a squirt of midge repellent as it was that sort of day and handed a map. The sculpture collection is dotted around the gardens and gave a structure to our walk. The sculptures vary and there is something for every taste and not every sculpture was one that we would have wanted to live with in our own plot! We explored the woodland areas with bluebells, the old rhododendrons and were particularly enchanted with the Japanese Garden. If you want refreshments there is usually a DIY cafe where you can help yourself and pop money in the honesty box.

Brodick Castle, Arran (middle right)

Brodick Castle is hard to miss on the island of Arran. If you travel on the ferry into Brodick you will spot the baronial castle on the hillside. The castle has both formal gardens and woodland trails. The formal gardens have the handsome castle as a backdrop and views to the sea. For me it was the woods that were the highlight, not because of the trees, although these are amazing. We made straight for the hide and sat quietly watching the chaffinches on the feeders, waiting for a red squirrel. Our patience was rewarded when two appeared, scampering quickly out of the trees and onto the squirrel feeder.  The feeder is a clever design with a glass jar resting on its side and filled with nuts so that we could watch the squirrels picking a nut and nibbling it before scampering away.  A few minutes later a third squirrel scurried over the logs and leapt up to the feeder only to find that a chaffinch had pottered along to eat the nuts. I’m not sure who was more surprised.  The chaffinch flew up and its wings struck the sides of the jar and the squirrel leapt backwards!

Ascog Hall Garden & Fernery, Bute (bottom left)

The blue poppies are what I remember about this garden on the Isle of Bute. We were there in early May, just the right time to see these stunning flowers at their best. Ascog Hall Gardens is a small and charming garden with enchanting qualities. It is divided into different areas and is dotted with some fun sculptures and water features. The sunken Victorian fernery is a green, warm and moist place with a fern they think is 1,000 years old. The gardens have not been able to open during Covid-19 in 2021 so check before you make a special journey. The parking area is small and we parked our campervan on Balmory Road that runs beside the garden.

Achamore Gardens, Gigha (bottom middle)

Delightful gardens to visit in spring, it was the woodland walks with rhododendrons, azaleas and camellias that I particularly enjoyed at Achamore on the Isle of Gigha. Just wandering with no destination in mind along the winding paths, stopping to admire the flowers is a perfect way to spend an hour or so. The gardens were created in the 1940s and have many unusual varieties that flourish in the warm micro-climate here. The walled garden is a perfect sheltered area when the sea breeze is blowing. We had taken the ferry over to Gigha from Kintyre and cycled to Achamore but it is only about 1.5 miles to walk.

Crathes Castle, Banchory (bottom right)

The castle isn’t the only star of the show at Crathes and it was too lovely an autumnal day to be inside the building and so, as usual, we explored the gardens and grounds. The views of the pink turreted castle from the lawns are worth seeing. I have a weakness for walled gardens and the one at Crathes is wonderful, divided into section with pools and fountains and themed planted areas. We were too late in the year for the glorious herbaceous borders but there was still plenty to enjoy. Crathes has a network of waymarked trails and we stretched our legs on the 6.5 km red trail around the estate. This took us through woodland that was packed with autumn colours. The estate has red squirrels but the only one we saw was a wooden carved one!

Author: Back on the Road Again Blog

I write two blogs, one about my travels in our campervan and living well and frugally and the second about the stories behind the people commemorated in memorial benches.

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