What do you keep in your campervan store cupboard?

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Cooking up a feast

We use our blue campervan all year around and so there is always food in the cupboard and dried ingredients in the storage containers.  If we had to [in that end of the world scenario] we could probably survive for a few weeks on just what is in the ‘van!  Fortunately, we use the ‘van enough that these tins and jars are rotated regularly enough.  What this means is that when we decide to head off on a trip all we need to pop in the Blue Bus’ kitchen cupboards is the fresh food from the fridge and bread bin.  Having these staple items to hand help us to build quick and delicious meals while we are on the road with the addition of a few fresh ingredients.  We can also use them to make a hearty meal if we haven’t had time to shop and want something quick after a long day.

What do you always have in your campervan food cupboard?

Our store cupboard staples:

  • Tins of chickpeas [great for hummus or stews and curries]
  • Small cartons of tomato passata or small tins of tomatoes for stews and sauces
  • Tins of those delicious large Greek beans in tomato sauce
  • Tins of artichoke hearts, sweetcorn, green beans and Spanish peppers [useful if we can’t get fresh vegetables or don’t have time to shop]
  • Jars of pesto [great for a quick meal when the day doesn’t go according to plan]
  • Delicious puy lentils in tins or packets and dried red lentils [they cook so quickly]
  • Jars of black and green olives to nibble or lift a dish of scratch ingredients
  • Peanut butter for sandwiches or stews
  • Marmite [wouldn’t go anywhere without it]
  • Jam and honey
  • Olive oil and balsamic vinegar
  • Herbs, spices and bouillon
  • Pasta, basmati rice, risotto rice and couscous
  • Biscuits, crackers and nuts
  • Bread mix for pitta bread or rolls [cheating I know but easier in the campervan]
  • Soya milk
  • A packet of ground coffee, tea bags, instant coffee & Barleycup
  • A few bottles of red wine and beer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perfect frugal veggie / vegan winter pie: Creamy leek & nutmeg

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I think I went somewhat over-the-top with the pastry decorations

In a British winter I long for warming and comforting food and this leek and nutmeg pie fits the bill.  This is an affordable but impressive pie with a creamy and tasty filling.  The pie is great for an everyday meal and also perfect for impressing guests.  It is easy to make and the ingredients below make enough for a 7 inch diameter pie dish.  This will feed two hungry and active people with a side serving of carrots and greens.  If you are entertaining it is enough for four adults if it comes after an appetiser / soup and the pie is served with your favourite potato dish [mine are roasties or Dauphinoise potatoes] and a colourful selection of vegetables.

Ingredients

  • 3 large leeks
  • large chunk of Butter or margarine
  • Fresh grated nutmeg
  • 3 tablespoons of creme fraiche (low fat is fine) or vegan cream
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Shortcrust pastry to line and top a 7 inch flan tin

Method

Halve the leeks and wash all the dirt from the layers.  Finely chop the leeks.  Melt the butter or margarine in a large pan and add the leeks.  Stir well, cover and leave to soften for about ten minutes, stirring occasionally.

Once the leeks are soft, add pepper and nutmeg and maybe salt if you haven’t used butter.  Put this aside to cool for an hour or so.  Before adding to the pastry case stir in the creme fraiche or vegan cream.

Preheat your oven to 180C/160C Fan/Gas 4.  Grease your flan tin.  Make your favourite pastry to be really frugal or buy it ready-made if you are short of time or room too roll.  Line the flan tin and fill this with the cooled leek mixture.  Top with another layer of pastry and decorate with left over pastry in your own style!  If I have time I sometimes create a lattice effect with strips of pastry for the top.  Brushing with egg yolk makes it look stunning if you are not cooking for anyone vegan and want to push the boat out.

Cook for around 40 minutes until golden brown.  The pie is moist and delicious and makes a good affordable and comforting winter meal.

 

Campervan vegan lemon cup cakes

Vegan lemon cup cakes
Vegan lemon cup cakes

Like many other campervans our Devon Tempest has just a small combined oven and grill that runs on gas.  While the grill is useful for comforting toast, I use the oven much less.  I sometimes whip up some garlic bread or make pitta breads but we don’t heat up ready meals in the ‘van [preferring to cook from scratch] and I usually cook meals on the hob.  I know there are those who cook a full Sunday roast in their oven but for others the oven is just the place to store the frying pans.  Recently I decided to get my money’s worth out of this piece of campervan equipment and make cakes.

We were taking a camping trip in the Peak District and were being joined for the weekend by working friends who were due to arrive on Friday evening.  As the two retirees with time on our hands we had arrived a day early and were in charge of the first evening cooking rota.  We wanted to spoil our hard-working friends and as well as a selection of curries we were keen to provide a pudding, but with one friend joining us who is a vegan, a shop-bought cake was not an easy option.

I spent a happy hour on the Friday morning having my very own bake-off in our tiny kitchen, not really expecting it to be too successful.  I have made vegan cakes at home and they are generally easy to throw together, not requiring the time consuming techniques you need for traditional sponge cakes.  In the ‘van I used reusable silicone cup cake cases to make a dozen lemon cup cakes and was pleased when they came out looking great.  Decorating cakes is not my strong point, I don’t have the patience for delicate work, so I cheated with ready-made icing to give the cakes the finishing touch to make them look special.

That evening the cakes were all wolfed down in no time and there is now no stopping me in terms of campervan baking, look out Martin Dorey!

Recipe for Vegan Lemon Cakes – makes a dozen cup cakes or one loaf

  • 255 gms plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder + 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 65 gms sugar + pinch of salt
  • Zest + juice of 1 lemon [around 60 mls]
  • 120 mls vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons of water
  • 240 mls of vegan yoghurt [milk-based plain yoghurt is fine  if you are not vegan]
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence
  • 50 gms melted vegan margarine

Preheat the over to 160C or similar.  Grease & line a 1 lb loaf tin if you are using this.

Sift the flour with the baking powder & soda and salt in to a bowl.  Add the lemon zest & sugar.

Add water, oil, yoghurt, lemon juice & melted margarine, combine quickly so that the flour is mixed in but do not over mix.

Pour your mixture in to your cup cake cases or loaf tin & bake until firm [about 40 minutes for the loaf tin, around 15 mins for the cup cakes].

Remove from the tin or cup cases & cool.  A simple topping is a glaze of 100 gms icing sugar mixed with the juice of a lemon [add this while the cake / cakes are still warm] or with other icing or topping of your choice.

 

 

Why I love cooking with my RidgeMonkey grill

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Aubergines cook well in the RidgeMonkey

I bought a RidgeMonkey grill / sandwich toaster after a recommendation from another campervan owner [thanks Andrew Ditton] and what a revelation it has been, almost transforming my campervan cooking overnight.  We generally have home-cooked food in our campervan, eat out in restaurants only on special occasions and only buy occasional veggie sausages for a fast food meal, so cooking is an important activity in our campervan.  Previously I have struggled, even with a lidded frying pan, to get my cooking really hot when trying to brown or char peppers, aubergines, asparagus and other vegetables.  They would cook but the pan never got quite hot enough to get them beyond soft and cooked to that attractive golden brown finish.  Making Spanish omelette was problematic too as they took a long time to cook through.  All these problems have now been solved by splashing out [£22] on a RidgeMonkey sandwich toaster.

This wonderful item is sold to anglers as a sandwich toaster, enabling them to make a hot meal while on the riverbank but it is so much more than that.  I am sure it will make toasted sandwiches but I use it for vegetables, omelettes, warming crumpets, hot cross buns or baking fresh pitta bread and I feel sure over the years I will find so many more uses for this practical and versatile piece of kit.  Other people report using their RidgeMonkey to create a full English breakfast and roast potatoes, the list of things you can cook in this wonderful pan is only as long as your imagination.

The RidgeMonkey opens in to two identical halves, both with a non-stick finish and each is just over 2 cms deep.  The dimensions of the XL are 20.5 x 18.8 cms, so it isn’t enormous and I would suggest you buy this size as it works well for cooking for one or two.  The long handles stay cool and fasten and clip together allowing you to turn it over and cook items such as omelettes or hot cross buns on both sides without turning them over.  This mechanism also locks in the heat and means I can enjoy golden brown aubergine [and other veg].  With a non-stick finish the RidgeMonkey is easy to wash and they now come with a selection of utensils that won’t scratch the non-stick finish.

Crumpets
Crumpets in the RidgeMonkey taste better than ever

Il dolce gelato

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A fairly alarming cornet in Greece

For all my talk of living simply and frugally you will spot me for a fraud when I tell you about my favourite food.  It is something that is an extravagant and unnecessary item that can hardly be considered food at all.  Although there are numerous different foods I enjoy, it is ice-cream that makes me happiest.  Even on a cool day, my first lick of a cornet will take me on a journey to other days in sunny climes and places I have eaten favourite ice-creams, delicious pistachio ice-creams in Italy, ice-cream dipped in melted chocolate in Eastern Europe and thick dairy farmhouse ice-creams in England and Scotland.  In my view, frozen cream combined with different flavours is heavenly, preferably in a good quality cornet [the ice-cream stall in Bouillon in Belgium is worth seeking out as they make delicious fresh waffle cornets while you wait as well as creamy ice-cream.]

Although if forced I will eat ice-cream at home, for me, this is really something to enjoy in the outdoors and is very much part of my life as a traveller.  I will often search out individual ice-cream parlours when we are away in the campervan.  On our trips we have discovered the luxurious Emilia Cremeria in Modena and the magnificent Portsoy Icecream in north-east Scotland and many more.

But we can’t always be away from home and in Manchester we are lucky to have Ginger’s Comfort Emporium in the city centre.  This cafe among the eclectic market stalls of Affleck’s makes ice-cream for grown-ups, with unusual combinations of flavours.  The salted caramel and peanut butter [aka Chorlton Crack] is really a meal in itself so get over to Manchester when you can, winter or summer.

 

 

Reasons to loathe winter washing up at campsites

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Outdoor washing up

Picture the scene.  It is dark and the wind is whipping around the campsite and heavy showers rush across the site in flurries.  The showers and toilets are cosy and warm but there is a frozen camper standing at the outdoor washing up sinks wrapped in fleeces, cagoule and a hat.  As they run the tap the water is whipped across the sinks as it is caught by the wind and under their breath the washer-up is cursing the campsite owner that has saved money by constructing dish-washing sinks that are open to the elements.

We like to camp all through the winter and in all sorts of weathers.  In winter we like to spend some time at a campsite with warm facilities that we can use in comfort and many sites fit this bill but let us down when it comes to washing up.  An all too common design for campsite dish-washing facilities is to have a roof but be open to the elements.  This has the advantage that you can stay dry in the inevitable rain [unless it is windy too] but even wrapped in layers the biting cold of the wind is tough for whoever is on washing up duties.

I understand outdoor washing up sinks in hot countries but in England, Scotland and Wales it seems optimistic at best.  Yes, of course we can wash up in the campervan and given these outdoor facilities we often do but this isn’t the point.  When we are on a campsite with facilities we like to use them and rather resent having to boil the kettle in the ‘van for hot water and do the dishes in our tiny sink when there are perfectly adequate sinks provided if only they were indoors.  We start to wonder why we pay for sites, we might as well be wild camping on these inclement nights [and often do this too].

There must be an off-the-shelf campsite facilities block that all these different campsites purchase as we see these outdoor sinks so often.  Or have these campsite owners never been camping themselves and so have never experienced the dish-washer agony?  We are so relieved when we arrive at a site, check out the facilities and find a room [with a door] [and ideally a window to watch the world from] for washing up in.  This luxury on a campsite is worth paying for!

A selection of campsites [not exhaustive] we have found where the dish-washing facilities are indoors:

Castlerigg Hall, Keswick

Inver Caravan Park, Dunbeath

Eye Kettleby Lakes, Melton Mowbray

Holgates at Silverdale

Caravan and Motorhome Club site at Wharfedale near Grassington

Caravan and Motorhome Club Site near Barnard Castle

 

 

 

Camping comfort food: dhal or lentil curry

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Dhal simmering in the pan

While the weather is below freezing I want to eat warming comfort food that is quick to make and delicious to eat.  My go-to recipe in these circumstances is lentil curry.  The recipe is below but it is a versatile dish that you can make your own and add to as suits you.  This is made from ingredients we always have in the store cupboard either at home or in the campervan and for me lentil curry is the ultimate comfort food, you can eat it from a bowl with just a fork [or even a spoon], it is warming and spicy and tasty and memories of all those other lentil curries from the past linger around it.

Dhal / lentil curry for two

Boil a pan of water with a pinch of salt and add two good handfuls (maybe 200 grams) of dried red lentils and a couple of bay leaves.  Boil and skim off any white scum as they boil and top up the water if necessary until the lentils are soft [about 20 minutes].  For this recipe you don’t have to boil the lentils dry.

Remove the bay leaves and put the lentils to one side [I put them in a bowl in the campervan and reuse the same pan for the next stage].

Fry a finely chopped onion in vegetable oil until it starts to catch and brown slightly and then add spices to suit you.  At home I use a teaspoon each of ground tumeric, ground cumin and ground coriander, a couple of crushed garlic cloves, a pinch of chili flakes or a fresh chili chopped and maybe a little fresh ginger if I have some in.  In the campervan I usually only have a garam masala mix and fresh garlic to hand.  Fry these for a minute or two and then add the lentils to the pan.  You are now more or less finished but you can garnish the curry with fresh coriander if you have this available.

For variety I sometimes add a couple of chopped tomatoes to the onion or a chopped courgette.  Sometimes I add some finely chopped spinach at the end and this adds some colour.

I serve this wonderful simple food with either plain boiled rice or naan bread or home-made chapattis, the choice is yours.  Not only is this quick to make it is also a cheap eat.  In the campervan naan bread keeps the washing up to just one pan which is a win-win.  Enjoy!