Britstops here we come

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Mr BOTRA studying the new Brit Stops guide

Wherever we park our campervan is our home, it is self-contained and we carry everything we need to be comfortable.  At present, with work restrictions, we generally spend about 70 nights a year in our motorhome.  To do this while continuing to save for our retirement we are always looking at ways to save so when the new Brit Stops guide arrived recently we started planning free nights away in the ‘van.

The Brit Stops scheme is a simple system [always the best ones].  Farm shops, pubs and food producers agree to host one or more motorhomes to park at their venue for a night for no charge.  For the cost of £30 for the guide, a motorhomer has a list of 640 places where they can park up for free.  This is modelled on the French Passion scheme that is popular across France.

Using Brit Stops we get to stay in some beautiful places and sometimes discover a new local food or drink.  We might stay at a farm shops and buy some cheese, or a café and relax over their breakfast the next morning or we might enjoy a pint of local beer in a country pub.  Brit Stops also allow us to be spontaneous as we don’t have to book a pitch many months before.  No sooner have we spotted a forecast for a spell of fine weather for the weekend and we can be on our way (although some Brit Stops do like motorhomers to ring ahead).

The beauty of Brit Stops for us is that we get the opportunity to buy good quality local food created with care by a small business which beats the mass-produced offerings in the supermarket any day.  Camp sites can be quite expensive in the UK and the Brit Stop guide can help us save money on our holidays (meaning we can take more].  In any year, once we have stayed two nights on a Brit Stops the guide has paid for itself, so we feel good, and we can support local businesses with some of the money we have saved, so we feel even better.

The number of places to stay has grown dramatically since Brit Stop started in 2011.  It took us a few years [and the ownership of a slightly bigger van] until we got the Brit Stop bug in 2015.  This happened when we were staying on a Caravan Club Certified Location that charged £15 for just a hook up on an uneven field where they hadn’t even bothered to cut the grass.  Down the road was a Brit Stop where ‘vans could park for free with views overlooking the canal; no competition, as they say.

 

 

 

Emotions vs economics

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Our beautiful insulated cafetiere and milk pan make great coffee and so make me happy

According to the National Employment Savings Trust (NEST) in the UK we have spent £6.2billion in the last five years on stuff we don’t need and rarely use.  If you thought that each of these impulse purchases added another day or two to your working life would you still buy that exercise machine, that electronic soup maker or that juicer that languishes at the back of a cupboard?  For me, having a goal to retire early helps to put a brake on the impulse to buy.  But everyone has to work it out for themselves and there are some interesting purchases listed here that are regretted and are now languishing in someone’s attic.

Of course, if you use your juicer every day, after exercising in your spare room and filling your soup maker then these products weren’t a wasted impulse buy for you … but we all have at least one guilty secret don’t we?  Even Mr BOTRA and I bought a rowing machine some years ago that was soon listed on Ebay.  Our insulated cafetiere and lovely milk pan [pictured above] by contrast was a well thought out purchase [for us] as it means that we can make good coffee in our ‘van that hasn’t become tepid before it is ready to drink [thus saving money in cafes].

Psychology Today considers there are reasons why we impulse buy; it might be that we love shopping or we don’t want to miss a bargain; because we are offered three for two or we have delusions that this new thingamajig will save us time or money or make us a better person.  What it comes down to is that humans often make an emotional decision about an economic activity.  Psychology Today also offers techniques for avoiding impulse buying.  The NEST article ends optimistically, suggesting that individuals learn from their impulse buying mistakes and all those regretted purchases are certainly the backbone of Ebay.

Mr BOTRA and I have had an expensive month [even though February is so short] and I am certainly not going to lecture anyone on their own purchasing choices.  But our shopping wasn’t done impulsively.  I follow a simple process to avoid wasting money; I write down what I think I want to buy [I don’t do this for groceries you understand], consider it for at least four weeks and finally decide if it is something we still need rather than want.  For us, walking boots and warm winter coats have all worn out recently and we opted to buy quality replacements that make a bigger hole in the budget but will [hopefully] last longer.  We have also made two recent purchases that will result in long-term savings.  The first is thermal vests; as I get older I become more of a wimp that craves the sunshine and warmth of summer; comfy and cosy thermals should keep the chills at bay and the heating bills down.  Secondly, after many months of deliberation, we have bought hair clippers that will save money on hair cutting and soon pay for themselves.

 

 

Counting the pennies for treats

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Back in the day (before Mr BOTRA and I went on our twelve month trip in the campervan around Southern Europe) we had a daily ritual of emptying our pockets, purses and wallets of any small change, from 50p downwards and putting it in a piggy bank.  Every couple of months the piggy bank would feel heavy enough and we would spend an hour of a wet Sunday afternoon counting the change into neat piles, putting it in plastic coin bags and depositing it in the bank later that week.  In a year we would accumulate about £250 just from the change in our pockets.

In those days we kept this money separate from our other savings and twice a year in January and August we would spent the small-change-savings in the Rohan sale.  Rohan sell travel and outdoor clothing that is high quality, easy to wash and quick to dry, doesn’t require ironing and of course looks great.  Part of the plan for the twelve month trip away in a small campervan was to maximise the space and practicality of the trip by taking only clothing that fitted those criteria.  We didn’t take Rohan gear exclusively but they were a large part of our wardrobe and still are.

Using the savings from our small change to buy what is (for us) fairly expensive clothing was an excellent way of making this affordable, allowing us to have a bi-annual treat and taking us towards our goal of a quick-drying, iron-free wardrobe.  For two people who don’t really enjoy shopping, these trips to the Rohan shop were anticipated with excitement and were all the more enjoyable for being funded by our pennies.

This seemed such a great way to treat ourselves without feeling guilty about using our savings.  Our treat was technical clothing but yours might be anything;  eating out, theatre tickets, computer games, books, holidays, music or tickets for rock concerts.  The key to success with this seemed to be the discipline of only spending what we have saved and buying something for both of us.

Today we spend our days mostly wearing technical outdoor gear and have been able to completely do away with the ironing ritual.  The outdoor clothing we have is mostly of such a high quality that I am confident some of it will see me out for the next 30 years of my life.

Nowadays we no longer need to buy any clothing or really feel a need for any expensive treats but we have kept the ritual of emptying our purses of change every evening.  The amount has reduced in the last few years as more of our spending is using plastic, rather than cash, but it still adds up to about £120 a year and this currently is added in to our fund for financial independence, rather than being earmarked for specific spending.  Perhaps when we finish work and are living off our savings we might once again use our small change savings for some sort of treat.

 

 

 

 

Magical and almost glamorous shoe cleaning?

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To get even a mention on this blog products have to be exceptionally good value; that is they are either really cheap or they hit all corners of the BOTRA-trinity of being affordable, high quality and long-lasting.  The wonderful Leather Genie shoe polish pushes these buttons and works better than any shoe cleaning product we have every used before.

When it comes to shoe cleaning Mr BOTRA and I don’t generally get over-excited but we have found this fantastic product saves us both money and time … a win-win in anyone’s books.

We found this super merchandise in an unlikely place.  We were strolling around the Caravan and Motorhome Show in Manchester last year, admiring ‘vans we couldn’t afford / didn’t need and looking at accessories we didn’t want when we spotted a shoe cleaning stall.  As usual my shoes needed some TLC and so I stopped to see what the fuss was about.  In just a few minutes the salesperson bought my shamefully scruffy walking shoes up to such a lovely shine I was astonished.  And yet, we don’t make snap purchasing decisions in the BOTRA household and so we had to do a few circuits of the venue mulling over the spending of £13 before we returned to the stall and came away with our very own pot of Leather Genie.

Leather Genie uses jo joba oil to give a shine to your leather, be it shoes, furniture or clothing.  The polish is quickly applied with a sponge in a no-mess fashion and shining your shoes takes only a minute or two and gives a grease-free lustre to leather in any colour.

No one would call me a smartly-dressed individual, my preferred look is comfy walking gear and that includes my shoes.  That said, I don’t like to waste money and throw shoes away just because they are scuffed.  I had a pair of burgundy leather shoes whose soles still had plenty of wear but which all sorts of cleaning products had failed to bring back to any sort of sheen and even I had become too ashamed to wear them for anything beyond going out to the bins.  A quick rub with the Leather Genie and these shoes were once again presentable, now that is a result.

I am not an enthusiastic shoe cleaner, as you can probably guess, and generally grab a pair of shoes just before I head through the door and as I put them on realise how shabby they look.  Because the Leather Genie is colourless and smells pleasant it is possible to quickly shine up my shoes without getting messy black / brown polish over my clothes and still get out of the house on time; this may not be glamorous but it is pretty cool.

We have had our tub of this magical shoe cleaning polish for over twelve months now and it looks like it will last a few more years, so £13 from the family budget well spent.

 

Giving thanks for our [affordable] daily bread

 

Germany Part Two (12)This magnificent sign over a German bakery suggests that bread gives life meaning and this is a sentiment I heartily agree with.

When we returned from our twelve months of travelling around southern Europe in our campervan Mr BOTRA and I had a dilemma regarding bread.  Although there were many things we enjoyed about being back home, we got no enjoyment from eating sliced English bread that had no taste or substance; we had become accustomed to having a bakery within walking distance of any campsite that sold a range of tasty local loaves and rolls.  It seemed in urban Salford the only options for bread were a supermarket or chain bakery and in both the bread was flavourless and insubstantial and didn’t hit the spot at all.

Don’t get me wrong, there are good traditional bakeries in Greater Manchester but these sit alongside a deli, a specialist cheese shop and an independent wine seller in the more expensive parts of the city and were a bus ride away, so didn’t tick any frugal boxes.  One of the downsides of living in the cheap end of town is the limitations of the local shops.

So what to do to get our daily bread?  When we lived in a larger house with a normal-size kitchen I baked bread regularly but in our diminutive kitchen finding the space to knead dough and leave it proving over a few hours is challenging … so my answer was to buy a bread maker.  I was apprehensive about the outlay for something we might not use and to save money bought a compact Morphy Richards model that was half the price of the most popular model; however, I needn’t have worried, I have been using this bread maker at least twice a week for almost six years now and it hasn’t missed a beat (touch wood) and just the paddle and baking tin have been replaced.  This bread maker makes a decent loaf that is flavourful with a good crust in three hours.  Morphy Richards no longer make the model we bought but I would certainly consider their bread makers when / if we have to replace our bread maker.

Of course, Salford has changed in the last few years following the creation of media city and many Eastern Europeans moving here.  I do now supplement our home-made bread with excellent Polish rye bread from the nearby Polski Sklep [an advantage to living in the unfashionable part of town) and we now have a Booths supermarket down the road where we can buy reasonable bread.  Of course, the frugal woman in me knows that it continues to be cheaper to make my own.

 

Comfortable in the cheap end of town

 

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Salford Quays isn’t the cheap end of Salford

We have spent our adult lives determined not to be defined by our possessions.  We have dressed in charity shop bargain finds and always been a few years behind the fashion;  we’ve camped and self-catered rather than had luxury holidays; we’ve managed with bicycles and no car and we’ve always lived in housing that is at the cheap end of the scale.  I know we now own a pretty new camper van but I don’t feel a need to justify this, it will last us years and doing without a camper van would be like sawing an arm off (… okay I realise I have just justified the owning of the ‘van right there).

At our time of life (in our 50s) we have a bunch of friends who own big houses full of expensive furniture, carry designer handbags and take holidays to exotic far-flung locations, fortunately they are prepared to be friends with such a thrifty couple.  When we first down-sized and moved to our small flat in the cheapest end of Salford (and Salford itself is the cheap end of Greater Manchester) we felt too ashamed to invite visitors round; what would they think of our frugal housing choice, how would they judge us?  After seven years living in our tiny home we are now more comfortable with the choice we made as it is clear that the decision is paying off and we are near to our goal of financial independence and early retirement.  We are mortgage-free, own a small flat that is inexpensive to heat and maintain and live in a development that has good security; useful for a couple who are always away in their camper van.

There are times when our choice is more difficult to deal with than others and particularly when it is our turn to host book group.  This involves entertaining and feeding ten people and we do it by squashing them around our dining table using an array of cheap folding chairs.  At first we were embarrassed that everyone has to shuffle around when one of the group wants to use the bathroom and that there is only comfy chair space for five, discouraging relaxing and chatting into the night (as we are getting too old to sit on the floor).  Now we are just grateful that our very good friends are willing to put up with this discomfort and visit and they don’t complain or judge us.

I am happy that we have lovely friends who accept our decisions, even though they are very different from their own and this helps us to feel comfortable living in the cheap end of town.

 

 

I saved my money

We are often asked how two low-paid public sector workers managed to afford a new campervan.  There is no mystery to this, we didn’t find a lucky money tree, win the lottery or rob a bank, the answer is that we saved our money to achieve our dream.

P1080174This (and perhaps my love of the west coast of Scotland) is why I feel a connection to the Deacon Blue song Dignity.  If you don’t know this song, you can hear Deacon Blue version here.  I became reacquainted with this beautiful song when the singer-songwriter Karine Polwart played her own version of this 1987 hit at a gig last year, after playing it at the National Theatre of Scotland Blabbermouth event in 2014.  This was a twelve hour celebration of Scottish music and spoken word on the eve of the Scottish referendum and you can see her playing it in this video.

The song is about a man who works for the council and is mocked by local children but who has a dream; over the years he saves his money to achieve his goal.  The song reminds us that no one is who they might seem at first glance and celebrates the hopes and dreams of those who work in humble but essential jobs.

I had dreamt about owning a campervan since I was 13-years old and although there were many years when this and a twelve month gap year in a van seemed unachievable and impractical Mr BOTRA and I got there eventually and the adventures are told on my first blog.  Now we are saving for early retirement because for us there is no dignity in working until we drop.

Dignity lyrics

There’s a man I meet
Walks up our street
He’s a worker for the council
Has been twenty years
And he takes no lip off nobody
And litter off the gutter
Puts it in a bag
And never thinks to mutter
And he packs his lunch in a Sunblest bag
The children call him Bogie
He never lets on
But I know ’cause he once told me
He let me know a secret
About the money in his kitty
He’s gonna buy a dinghy
Gonna call her Dignity

And I’ll sail her up the west coast
Through villages and towns
I’ll be on my holidays
They’ll be doing their rounds
They’ll ask me how I got her I’ll say
I saved my money
They’ll say isn’t she pretty
That ship called Dignity

And I’m telling this story
In a faraway scene
Sipping down Raki
And reading Maynard Keynes
And I’m thinking about home
And all that means
And a place in the winter
For Dignity

Chorus

Set it up (repeat)

And I’m thinking about home
And I’m thinking about faith
And I’m thinking about work
And I’m thinking
How good it would be
To be here some day
On a ship called Dignity
A ship called Dignity
That ship