In an Uncertain World & a Pandemic who needs a Travel Writer!

05.29.2019 Eshaness (1)

I am feeling discombobulated and not particularly useful at the moment. No one wants to read a travel writer’s blog in these days full of coronavirus disease [Covid-19]. We are all feeling confused and worried in different ways; some of us are concerned about elderly friends or relatives; some motorhomers are wondering whether to stay in Spain, Portugal or France or come home; we might worry about whether we washed our hands enough and why we can’t stop touching our faces [or is that just me?] and others are wondering where they can buy toilet roll or dried pasta.  In this period of social distancing a full lock-down is only a matter of time and even though my fear of when this will happen doesn’t help, the fear remains.  On top of this global apprehension, the campervan and motorhome community is arguing amongst itself about whether anyone can follow social distancing rules in a ‘van and what essential travel actually means.  The only certainty is that very few people are looking ahead and planning holidays and trips away.

I am not alone in living during a time that just a few weeks ago seemed fairly humdrum, I was blogging about being a frustrated travel agent and also busy writing and planning my own campervan trips for the year.  Those days seem very carefree and distant as uncertainty has mushroomed and I am finding this increasingly difficult to deal with.  I am sure I am not alone in wishing that I knew how long this state of emergency was going to go on for.  Last night we watched an episode of Countryfile from a few weeks ago, it was in many ways a calming escape to a world before all we thought about was a virus but as soon as we switched off the TV I remembered and the dread returned.

I long for the pandemic to be declared over, returning some stability to everyone’s lives but I realise that isn’t going to happen soon.  It may be that we never return to how things were but I hope that eventually people will begin to look to the future with confidence again.

In addition, of course … and this is only a minor worry … I am also aware that if I can’t get away travelling and camping then I will have no income.

Please don’t think I am feeling sorry for myself. Although we are both over 60 years of age, we are both in good health and have every reason to feel confident that Covid-19 will make us poorly but not kill us … but as apparently we are all going to get Covid-19 eventually, if it is my time than I have had 60 good years.  It is not for myself that I am anxious, what I dread is anyone across the world suffering unnecessarily and I fear for my close friends and relatives.

I Know that I am not alone in feeling anxious and fearful about the difficult and stormy future road ahead, so I am no expert but here are …

… My ideas for coping with coronavirus anxiety

  1. Although I have a strong need for information, too much news consumption is more than I can handle. Limiting my access to the news and Facebook does help to keep me on an even keel. I try hard to be aware of what is factual and what is conjecture and keep a reasonable perspective.
  2. In contrast, the social media that is supportive is Twitter. My Twitter friends for the most part keep me positive and are kind – thanks guys!
  3. I have always been an obsessive hand washer after too many years in the NHS and the annual infection control talk, so we are washing our hands thoroughly.  We are maintaining social distance and keeping a check on our own health.
  4. While we will miss our tai chi classes, closed during this social distancing period, we keep practising most days.  Tai chi is fantastic for focusing the mind and relaxation.
  5. I might not be sure when I will once again be able to travel to mainland Europe but at the moment I continue brushing up my German so that I am ready for when those borders open. This half an hour a day of language learning is time when I am not worrying about any end-of-the-world scenario.
  6. Reading is always my favourite relaxation and I have sought out uplifting and funny novels to get me through. This is not the time to read Lionel Shriver’s The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047 – save this roller-coaster novel for happier times, although it has been haunting me this last two weeks.  Instead I have been re-reading Magnus Mills and getting lost in his comedic and fantastical world and I have a Neil Gaiman on my reading pile.
  7. After living in a small village for 25 years I am accustomed to always keeping well-stocked kitchen cupboards and what might be stockpiling for some is my normal. We could live for a couple of weeks at least on the food in our house and yet I have to admit to a real fear about the shortages and I struggle to keep this in any kind of measured perspective. For example, as a bread maker we are down to our last two bags of flour and haven’t been able to buy more as the whole country appears to have taken to baking bread! While I am pleased everyone has discovered the joy of homemade bread, when I think about running out of flour I want to weep and I have to remind myself that at the moment we continue to eat well on healthy home-cooked food.
  8. We are keeping in touch with friends and family, making sure everyone is coping and keeping the love and care flowing between us.
  9. It might be twee but I count my blessings, knowing I am so lucky to live with my wonderful partner in the amazing town of Morecambe with the sea and the bay only down the road. We get out for some fresh air every day which helps my mental health and my sleeping.
  10. I am not naive, I know that everything will not be okay in the short-term but I try and make myself step back and give myself space to reflect on what the numbers of cases and deaths and the shortages of essential items actually means and why they are making me feel so anxious. With effort I can think it through, sort out the speculation from the facts, calm my brain and remember that this too will pass.

What are your own tips for avoiding overwhelming anxiety?

All in all, this seems like the right time for me to take a short break from travel blogging, although I might try and conjure up some light-hearted content in the near future.

Take care everyone, stay kind and we’ll catch up soon.

More Campervan Comfort Food: Fennel & Cream with pasta [vegan or veggie]

Fennel and cream (2)

You return to your campervan after a long walk on a cold or wet day and what you need is something warming to eat that only takes 15 minutes max to prepare and cook.  In our Blue Bus, pasta is a great go-to dish for these evenings.

I love the taste of fennel but I wonder if it isn’t so popular in the UK.  I bought some in our local supermarket recently and the cashier didn’t even know what it was and when I asked admitted he had never eaten it.  For me, fennel brings back memories of Italy and the beautiful food that country produces.  I also love the fresh spicy liquorice taste and the crunchy texture.  You might read that it is good for you but don’t let that put you off, it just tastes great.

This dish can be vegetarian or vegan, depending on your own preference.  If you don’t like fennel you could use asparagus, broccoli spears or courgettes in this recipe too, they all also cook quicker than you can pour a couple of glasses of wine!

Fennel & Cream with pasta [for two]

  • 1 bulb of fennel
  • 3 or 4 spring onions
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 200 – 300 ml of sour cream or vegan cream, grated
  • 100 gm or so of cheese [I used half a packet of vegan Greek white cheese I had in the fridge but anything will do]

Wash and then slice the fennel thinly [I use pretty much all of it, including the outer bulb, the stalk and leaves – just cutting out the hard inner core].

Heat the oil in a wok or large frying pan [or your Ridgemonkey grill] and add the fennel.  Stir and cook until the fennel is softened.

Meanwhile put your favourite pasta on to boil as this is fast food.

Add the spring onion, black pepper and garlic to the fennel and stir. then add the cream and warm through.

Finally add the cheese and then season [with the cheese you probably won’t need any salt].

When your pasta is cooked, drain and add to the creamy mixture, stir in well and serve.

After a long day walking I would serve this up with a bunch of rocket if we had it and a glass of red wine [we always have this].

 

 

 

 

 

Sunshine Blogger Award

sunshine blog

 

I would like to thank Jackie and Mark [and of course their canine companions] from the excellent blog World Wide Walkies for this nomination for a Sunshine Blogger Award.  They gave up work, bought a caravan and four cavapoos, sold most of what they owned and began travelling full-time, mixing up living in their caravan with rentals.  They have a tremendous sense of adventure and their posts are always entertaining and thoughtful.

The Sunshine Blogger award is given by bloggers to bloggers who inspire positivity and creativity in the blogging community.

The Rules

  1. Thank the blogger(s) who nominated you for a blog post and link back to their blog.
  2. Answer the 11 questions the blogger asked you.
  3. Nominate up to 11 new blogs to receive the award. Leave a comment on their blog to let them know they received the award and ask your nominees 11 new questions.
  4. List the rules and display the Sunshine Blogger Award logo in your post and/or on your blog.

My answers

1. What is the inspiration behind your blog and who do you want to reach?

The inspiration for my Back on the Road blog is two-fold.  It firstly gives me a chance to document some of our travels in our campervan, the Blue Bus, and secondly gives me time to practice my writing technique and try out ideas, without the constraints and word limits of magazine editors.  I hope to reach other people who are interested in living a purposeful and frugal life and who enjoy reading about beautiful and interesting places.

2. Which is your favourite blog post and why?

This is a tough question!  I like to write posts that are useful so my top tips for different destinations are great posts that I am pleased with as they get a lot of hits.  Everyone likes a drama and so the stats say it is my blog post about our Greek incident – not something I like to remember!  I like to tell stories and one of my favourites is the Tale of the Postman, because the incident marks my early retirement and a new life and it is a story of a helpful postman that you might not expect to encounter in Salford.

3. Tell us an interesting or unusual fact about yourself – do you have a hidden talent or claim to fame?

I write another blog about memorial benches I find on our travels and write a mixture of travelogue and the story of the person that is remembered in the bench.  This blog was featured on Radio Four recently.

4. Name your favourite song, book and movie.

Song – It is so hard to choose but pretty much anything by Black Sabbath would be in the running.

Book – Today it is Death and Penguin by Andre Kurkov [this choice might be something different tomorrow]

Film – Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe – it makes me laugh and cry every time I see it

5. What’s on your bucket list?

There is no bucket list.  I am happy that I am able to explore new and familiar places independently.

6. What piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

Don’t waste your time marrying that first husband, he will treat you badly and try and break you.

7. Living or dead, which three people would you invite to your dinner party and why?

Although I wanted to say three good friends would be my choice, I thought I would play the game.  If I was inviting people I didn’t know round for dinner I would get Geezer Butler, bass player with Black Sabbath, Chris Wolstenholme, the bass player with Muse and Stuart Maconie together.  We could start with music and see where the conversation went.

8. Is your ideal holiday lying on a beach, climbing Mount Everest – or anything else?

My ideal holiday is being pretty much anywhere with my partner Anthony in our campervan.  I like to be somewhere warm but never lie on the beach.  My ideal day is walking in the mountains among wild flowers and bird song, the warm sun on my arms and no one else around.

9. What would you do if you won the Lottery?

I did blog about what I would do if I had loads of money and writing my thoughts certainly helped me work out what I might do.  I would give some to my favourite local charities, some to our son and daughter-in-law and then spend some on travel, in particular going to visit our lovely friends in California and Australia.

10. How do you relax? Do you have a guilty pleasure?

I don’t feel guilty about enjoying myself and relaxing.  I have loved getting lost in books since I was a child and this a favourite relaxation.  My biggest fear is running out of books to read while we are away in our campervan!

11. Dogs or cats?

This was the easiest question to answer!  I have had the pleasure to live with six different cats in my life.

My Nominees

I follow lots of blogs and can’t nominate them all.  I am also aware that after the first flush of excitement has worn off about being given the Sunshine Blogger Award, you might realise it involves writing another post!  I tried to give this task to people who will grasp the opportunity with enthusiasm but if any of you want to skip the post that is, of course, your call.  I do hope you all think about following some of my favourite bloggers.

OurTour Motorhome Blog – Julie and Jason have reached financial independence and are travelling in their motorhome.  As well as blogging they have published several books.  Their posts are both practical and fun and always honest about the ups and downs of living in a van.

The Urban Wanderer – Sarah is a Manchester-based blogger whose outdoor travel and lifestyle blog always has something new and interesting to share.  Her enthusiasm will win you round and encourage you to get outside and have a mini adventure.

Gail and Keith Blog – Gail and Keith share their motorhome travels, delicious recipes [with mouth-watering photographs] and even tips on wine with a flair and energy.  Their blog gives you a feel for life on the road.

Bon Voyage Blog – Jane and Tim are determined not to let life pass them by and are travelling full-time in their motorhome.  Their blog is honest, thoughtful and interesting as they share what they have learned as they travel.

Tea & Cake for the Soul – Jo is a hardworking freelance writer and blogger, a music, cake and tea lover who enjoys reading, writing and upcycling.  Jo’s blog, like mine, is a mixture of travel and lifestyle.  She has tips on surviving the menopause alongside trips along the Basingstoke Canal.

(Get Your) Legs Down – To non-caravanners the title of Richard’s blog might seem unusual.  This beer-drinking caravan owner writes what he calls, ‘random ramblings’ but are useful and informative diary-style blog posts about his trips away in his caravan.  He has also written openly about his grief following the sudden loss of his partner, Trev, after 27 years together.

Eyes in the back of my Head – Joyce likes to surprise her readers with sensitive and well-observed posts about a whole range of topics.  Joyce shares stories from her travels in her motorhome, about life with her dog, reading, nature and astrological psychology and is always a kind and generous blogger.

In Pursuit of a Dream – Deb and Steve are a caravan owning couple, originally from the north, now living in the south and working as wardens for the Caravan and Motorhome Club.  Their posts are often funny and always compelling as they follow their dream to, ‘Work less, live more, see more and meet more.’

Brian Jones’ Diary – I have been enjoying reading the journey of this newish blogger.  Brian is 60 years old and transitioning into retirement.  He writes sincerely about the things that are important to him at this time in his life, his health, family and friends, finances and how to enjoy life in this transition phase.

Gum Trees and Galaxies – This Australian dog-owning couple have adventures in their teardrop camper.  The name sums up their trips out to the bush to escape the light pollution and stargaze.  As well as camping stories they are enthusiastic about books and their blog has reading tips and #BooksnapSunday.

My 11 Questions

  1. What is your favourite thing about blogging?
  2. What would be your top tip for a new blogger?
  3. Assuming you are still with us, do you think you will still be blogging in five years time?
  4. If you could have something named after you (either your real name, nickname, or blog name) what would it be?
  5. If you could have one super power what would it be?
  6. What is your favourite road trip film?
  7. What is your first drink of the day, tea, coffee, smoothie, water or something else?
  8. What song would you like played at your funeral?
  9. If you could go back in time, what event or period would you go back to?
  10. I was a chef in a previous life and love cooking and eating, what is your signature dish / favourite thing to cook / eat?
  11. Where in the world do you feel you most belong?

I look forward to reading your answers.  Thank you all and happy Sunshine blogging!

A Spanish Parking Challenge in Pedraza

Pedraza Castle
The castle at Pedraza

There are many places that travel writers refer to as one of Spain’s ‘best kept secrets,’ in truth when you visit pretty much any of these so called hidden corners you realise that they are no secret to the Spanish.  The Spanish value and conserve attractive villages and on a weekend you rarely have any of them to yourself.

That isn’t to say these places are not worth visiting!  We were in northern Spain in our campervan and had been seeking out some of Spain’s Los Pueblos más bonitos, their most beautiful villages.  The walled town of Pedraza in the province of Segovia in the Castile and Leon region is one of these villages and was just off our route one wintery Sunday.  We decided it would make a perfect detour for an hour or so.

Not wanting to get the Blue Bus stuck in the narrow streets that led to the large car park by the castle, we opted for the small parking area below the substantial walls.  It was already busy as we pulled in but this was before lunch time and there was still manoeuvring room.

Glad to find a space, we tucked in without turning around, an amateur error!  Almost immediately a small Spanish car came in behind us, so close its bonnet was under our bike rack!  An old VW ‘van then tucked in within centimetres of our bonnet and as the car park filled up around us we slowly realised getting out was going to be challenging.  We decided to explore the lovely town and hope that all these people were just here for a half an hour stroll.

The Plaza Mayor is the focus of the town with arcades of shops and restaurants, where people were beginning to gather for a long Spanish Sunday lunch.  We admired the San Juan church and its lovely square tower on the side of the square and walked to the imposing 13th century castle that has been restored.

After exploring the streets of Pedraza, admiring the view from near the castle and browsing in some of the shops, we returned to a still crowded car park.  Cars had packed themselves on both sides of the narrow parking area and turning a 5.4 metre ‘van was now impossible.

The entrance to the gravelly car park was at the bottom and it then sloped steeply up to a gateway which was blocked with hazard tape.  We realised we either had to stay here until the Spanish rolled out of the restaurants or, as this was in the direction we were pointing, we could try and use the higher taped-up exit.  While I provided extra eyes and waved my arms around, my partner shunted the ‘van backwards and forwards out of our space.  Once free he eased between the cars, skidding on the steep gravelly gradient.  I ran ahead and quickly hauled the post out of the ground and moved the tape aside.  Our Renault skidded through, trailing rubber and we were out!

As I attempted to replace the tape, excited Spanish drivers, having spotted there was now a 5.4 metre space in the car park and a new entrance, tried to drive past me.  I was worried someone in authority would suddenly arrive and tell us this exit shouldn’t be used and had to muster my most assertive Spanish to return the tape across the gateway.

We broke two campervan rules on this day.  Driving into a busy and tight car park is best avoided and if you do, always turn the ‘van around while you can!

We stayed at:

Camping Riaza, a level site in the Segovia province north of Madrid.  There are mountain views from the site and some road noise.  A pleasant small town with shops and bars is a short walk away and there is information about local walks.  The facilities are clean and the showers are continuous (no push buttons here) and very hot.